1. Droplets of the morning,

    Droplets of the morning,

  2. Thunderstorm at Sea, Thunderstorm over Stradbroke Island. Taken from Victoria Point, QLD.

    Thunderstorm at Sea, Thunderstorm over Stradbroke Island. Taken from Victoria Point, QLD.

  3. a discussion on sexual orientation

    • me: *explaining various sexual orientations to a classmate*
    • classmate: wait, what's polyamory?
    • me: well, it's when someone has more than one intimate relationship at a time with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved.
    • professor: *overhears from front of class*
    • professor: that is d i s g u s t i n g
    • me: *defensively* um, actually, no it's--
    • professor: how DARE they put a greek prefix on a latin root like that?! What right do they have to decimate my beautiful antiquated languages?!?! GREEK AND LATIN DO NOT FRATERNIZE THIS IS LIKE THAT STUPID ROMANTIC SUBPLOT BETWEEN THAT DWARF AND THAT ELF IN THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG NO NO NO NO NO NO!!!
    • me: ....
    • me: ....
    • me: ....
    • professor: it should be polyerosy
    Reblogged from: mediocre-latinist
  4. Why GamerGate Is Destined To Fail

    deathofgamergate:

    What Is GamerGate?

    It’s the Tea Party of video games. And Zoe Quinn is its Benghazi.

    Okay, But What Is GamerGate Really?

    GamerGate has been disingenuously framed as a grassroots campaign of gamers “concerned with the quality and integrity of video game journalism.” The campaign is, in…

    "GamerGate, at its core, is about a woman being denied sexual agency."

    Reblogged from: deathofgamergate
  5. secret-icecream-empress:

    Ride - Seagull

    Reblogged from: secret-icecream-empress
  6. jeannepompadour:

Praying women from the tomb of Sir Thomas Cave (d. 1613) and his wife

My partners grandmother lives near this church. I have a a few pictures of the church at Stanford; it’s very lovely.

    jeannepompadour:

    Praying women from the tomb of Sir Thomas Cave (d. 1613) and his wife

    My partners grandmother lives near this church. I have a a few pictures of the church at Stanford; it’s very lovely.

    Reblogged from: jeannepompadour
  7. Double yellow and purple,

    Double yellow and purple,

  8. hildegardavon:

The Caryatid Porch on the Athenian Acropolis
Athens,  Greece

    hildegardavon:

    The Caryatid Porch on the Athenian Acropolis

    Athens,  Greece

    Reblogged from: fightingscholarlykrogan
  9. humanoidhistory:

    GREETINGS FROM POMPEII — Vintage visions of the ancient ruins of Pompeii, Italy, circa 1905, photochrome color postcards from the Detroit Publishing Company, courtesy of the Library of Congress.

    Reblogged from: thebacchant
  10. sktagg23:

    Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

    Reblogged from: frankiethejoker
  11. archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Oak Wreath from the Dardanelles, 4th century BC
This naturalistic wreath of oak-leaves and acorns is supported on two golden branches that are now reinforced by a modern copper core. At the back the branches end in obliquely cut end-plates, at the front they are held together by a split pin fastener concealed by a golden bee. Each branch bears six sprays with eight leaves and seven or eight acorns, as well as a cicada. Additionally, about a dozen single leaves are attached directly to each branch.
Gold wreaths were made in imitation of various leaves, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities; for example, the oak was sacred to Zeus.
Wreaths were left in burials in Macedonia, southern Italy, Asia Minor and the North Pontic area from the fourth century onwards. This wreath is said to have come from a tomb somewhere on the Dardanelles. Despite their obvious fragility, the Greek orator Demosthenes (384-322 BC) writes that gold wreaths were worn for certain religious ceremonies. The inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries also show that large numbers of gold

    archaicwonder:

    Greek Gold Oak Wreath from the Dardanelles, 4th century BC

    This naturalistic wreath of oak-leaves and acorns is supported on two golden branches that are now reinforced by a modern copper core. At the back the branches end in obliquely cut end-plates, at the front they are held together by a split pin fastener concealed by a golden bee. Each branch bears six sprays with eight leaves and seven or eight acorns, as well as a cicada. Additionally, about a dozen single leaves are attached directly to each branch.

    Gold wreaths were made in imitation of various leaves, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities; for example, the oak was sacred to Zeus.

    Wreaths were left in burials in Macedonia, southern Italy, Asia Minor and the North Pontic area from the fourth century onwards. This wreath is said to have come from a tomb somewhere on the Dardanelles. Despite their obvious fragility, the Greek orator Demosthenes (384-322 BC) writes that gold wreaths were worn for certain religious ceremonies. The inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries also show that large numbers of gold

    Reblogged from: classicsenthusiast
  12. skysquids:

    Björk shits on poets with a poor understanding of technology, while inventing the word ‘scientifical’.

    bjork is fucking perfect.

    Reblogged from: xaidread
  13. historical-nonfiction:

    Most anthropologists and biologists view race as a political grouping with roots in slavery and colonialism. The number of races and who belongs in each race have shifted over time and nations—not because of responses to scientific advances in human biology, but rather in response to political purposes.

  14. ancientpeoples:

Bow Brooch
2nd Century AD
Roman
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

    ancientpeoples:

    Bow Brooch

    2nd Century AD

    Roman

    (Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

    Reblogged from: pchslatinclub
  15. johnnyxtreason:

    Anarcho-capitalism? More like “I wanna be a rebel but not so much that my dad cuts off my trust fund.”

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